Humanism, European Football & Feldenkrais

“Perhaps what really differentiates Bruyninckx from other coaches is that he is not only interested in creating better football players, but also wants to create better human beings…”  (from the article)

Click here for a fascinating look into the highly imaginative and humanistic approach of Belgian football coach, Michel Bruyninckx. Bruyninckx’s innovative use of constraints along with measures for cognitively overloading players provide an excellent model for learning and integrating a myriad of complex patterns while removing the unnecessary self-judgment. I call it the Feldenkrais-Erickson-Inner Game (Moshe Feldenkrais, Milton Erickson, W. Timothy Gallwey) approach.

What if we’re being conditioned in such a way that we can no longer read anything in depth? What if the way we read influences the way we think?

“In the world of 2001, people have become so machinelike that the most human character turns out to be a machine. That’s the essence of Kubrick’s dark prophecy: as we come to rely on computers to mediate our understanding of the world, it is our own intelligence that flattens into artificial intelligence.” (from the article)

Click here to read Nicholas Carr’s insightful article in the Atlantic on how technology has changed and continues to change the way we live and think.

 

A nice look into some of the biomechanics, physiology and emotions in the 100m dash

Look for the metatarsal-tibia-femur connection as well as the metacarpal-ulna-humerus connection in the super slow motion sequences (5:50-6:00 and 11:50 to 12:24). Both connections work in spirals. Also listen to the role of emotions, trying too hard and the resultant “co-contractions” (or what Feldenkrais would call, “parasitic contractions”) in Asafa Powell’s defeat to Tyson Gay  (35:26 to 26:15)

A few words on Feldenkrais

“We have forgotten that the first maxim covered life as well as sport judo and few of us seem to have ever learned the meaning of the second (which means simply love).” 

                                                                                                 -Robert W. Smith

The Feldenkrais Method was born out of a childlike curiosity that all of us possess–even if it lies dormant beneath layers of assimilation to our fast-paced culture. Its founder, Dr. Moshe Feldenkrais, exemplified the same fiercely independent way of thinking that we see in all great scientists, musicians, artists, writers, dancers and athletes—indeed, anyone who values exploration, uncertainty and playfulness. It is also the same sort of mindset that we see in infants, toddlers and young children and that we ourselves embody in our more spontaneous, less defensive and perhaps more vulnerable moments.

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“There’s a muse within us all, which must be kissed and brought to life.” (from the video)

A documentary comparing our advanced, mechanized culture to more “primitive” ones that are thoroughly infused with rhythm, attention to beauty and life.

“It’s not just a question of getting form A to B, it’s all the things that can happen in between.”
                                                                                                -Jon Roar Bjorkvold

I often call Feldenkrais, “the art of listening”

“Many people make the mistake of confusing information with knowledge. They are not the same thing. Knowledge involves the interpretation of information. Knowledge involves listening.”               

                                                                                                         -Henning Mankell

In this poignant NYT op-ed, Swedish author, Henning Mankell, may be pointing to exactly what makes us human (and why in this day and age, we are becoming less so).