A few words on Feldenkrais

“We have forgotten that the first maxim covered life as well as sport judo and few of us seem to have ever learned the meaning of the second (which means simply love).” 

                                                                                                 -Robert W. Smith

The Feldenkrais Method was born out of a childlike curiosity that all of us possess–even if it lies dormant beneath layers of assimilation to our fast-paced culture. Its founder, Dr. Moshe Feldenkrais, exemplified the same fiercely independent way of thinking that we see in all great scientists, musicians, artists, writers, dancers and athletes—indeed, anyone who values exploration, uncertainty and playfulness. It is also the same sort of mindset that we see in infants, toddlers and young children and that we ourselves embody in our more spontaneous, less defensive and perhaps more vulnerable moments.

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“There’s a muse within us all, which must be kissed and brought to life.” (from the video)

A documentary comparing our advanced, mechanized culture to more “primitive” ones that are thoroughly infused with rhythm, attention to beauty and life.

“It’s not just a question of getting form A to B, it’s all the things that can happen in between.”
                                                                                                -Jon Roar Bjorkvold

I often call Feldenkrais, “the art of listening”

“Many people make the mistake of confusing information with knowledge. They are not the same thing. Knowledge involves the interpretation of information. Knowledge involves listening.”               

                                                                                                         -Henning Mankell

In this poignant NYT op-ed, Swedish author, Henning Mankell, may be pointing to exactly what makes us human (and why in this day and age, we are becoming less so).

Patience, perseverance and diving into the process… in a word, learning

“…some of the brightest kids prove to be the most vulnerable to becoming helpless, because they feel the need to live up to and maintain a perfectionist image that is easily and inevitably shattered. As an observer of countless talented young chess players, I can vouch for the accuracy of this point—some of the most gifted players are the worst under pressure, and have the hardest time rebounding from defeat.”

                                                                                                             -Josh Waitzkin

Click here to listen to a revealing story on NPR’s Morning Edition about patience, perseverance and diving in the process rather than needing the instant result. A simple word for this is:  learning.

 

When assumptions lead us astray

“…assumptions form the basis of what we have already learned. What we have learned in the past, however, is not always appropriate for the present. And this means that learning—which only takes place in the present—could be considered the active process of uncovering assumptions—specifically false ones. -from the book

Watch this intriguing video and see if you can decipher what’s actually happening.